Using Information
Google docsEBSCODrop BoxFacts on FileGale-Global Issues
Website Evaluation
This is the "Using Information" page of the "Franklin at Alma Library Resource Center Orientation" guide.
Alternate Page for Screenreader Users
Skip to Page Navigation
Skip to Page Content

Franklin at Alma Library Resource Center Orientation   Tags: citations, databases, destiny, ebooks, franklin at alma, library, orientation, resources, sievert  

A Quick Guide to resources available for Students, Parents and Teachers.
Last Updated: Aug 22, 2011 URL: http://libguides.mpsaz.net/content.php?pid=210923 Print Guide RSS Updates

Using Information Print Page
  Search: 
 

Using Information

Information

No matter where you get information it is important to question the source to determine its credibility and application to your need. When evaluating a source there are six broad criteria you can use for this process.

      

    Copyright Information

    Authority

    Authority

    • Who is the author?
    • Do you recognize the author's name?
    • If you don't recognize the name, what type of information is given about the author?
      • Position?
      • Organizational affiliation?
      • E-mail address?
      • Biographical information?
    • What expertise/credentials does he or she have on this topic?
    • Is contact information available?
    • Who sponsors the site?
    • Was the source referenced in a document or website that you trust?

     (Back)

     

        
       

      Accuracy

      Accuracy

      • Does the information presented seem accurate?
      • Are the facts verifiable? 
      • Does the author cite the sources of information he or she used to develop the document?
      • Is it possible to verify the legitimacy of these sources?

      (Back)

       

      Coverage

      Coverage

      • Are the topics covered on the site explored in depth?
      • Are the links in the site comprehensive or used as examples?
      • In the site, are the links provided relevant and appropriate?
      • How useful is the information provided for the topic area?

      (Back)

       

      Relevency

      Relevancy

      • Is the information relevant to your research?
      • Would you quote information from this source in a research project?

      (Back)

       

      Up-To-Date

      Up-To-Date

      • On what date was the document created?
      • Do you need more current information?
      • If applicable, do links on the document still connect to their destination?
      • Is a date clearly displayed?
      • Can you determine what the date refers to?
        • When the document was first written?
        • When the document was first posted or published?
        • When the document was last revised or updated?
        • The copyright date?
      • Are the resources used and information provided by the author current?
      • Does the document content demand routine or continual updating or revision? If yes, is this being done?

      (Back)

       

      Objectivity

      Objectivity

      • What position or opinion is presented and does it seem biased?
      • What kind of sites does this one link to?
      • Determine what is the aim of the author or organization publishing the site.
      • What is the purpose of the web site:
        • Is it advertisement for a product or service?
        • Is it for political purposes?
        • Is it trying to sway public opinion on a social issue?
      • Do you trust the author or organization providing the information?

      (Back)

      Description

      Loading  Loading...

      Tip