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Study Guide for Acts I-II
Study Guide for Acts I-II
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Study Guide for Acts III-V
Study Guide for Acts III-V
This is the "A Midsummer Night's Dream: Act I" page of the "A Midsummer Night's Dream" guide.
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A Midsummer Night's Dream   Tags: martin, midsummer night's dream, shakespeare  

A short foray into the land of the Bard
Last Updated: Jun 12, 2013 URL: http://libguides.mpsaz.net/amidsummernightsdream Print Guide RSS Updates

A Midsummer Night's Dream: Act I Print Page
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The Least You Should Know: Basic Comprehension

1. What are Theseus and Hippolyta discussing at the play's start?

2. How does Hippolyta come to be betrothed to Theseus?

3. Why is Egeus disturbed?

4. What will be Hermia's fate if she refuses to marry Demetrius?

5. To what do Lysander and Hermia agree?

6. What hope does Helena have by telling Demetrius of Lysander and Hermia's flight?

7. Who are the characters in scene two, and what do they plan?

 

Vocabulary Power: Words to Know

  • filched
  • abjure
  • persuasion
  • revenue
  • visage
  • base
  • perjured
  • lamentable
  • extempore
  • discretion
     

    How to Use this Guide

    1.  Read Acts as assigned

    • Each page has linked text in left-hand column

    2.  Record answers to study guide questions on your copy of guide 

    • Study guides can be accessed on pull-down menu for each Act
    • See "Least You Should Know" boxes in left-hand columns for quick reference 

    3.  Complete Vocabulary activities

    • Located on study guides; see links to guides on pull-down menu for each Act
    • See "Vocabulary Power" boxes in left-hand columns for quick reference

    4.  Be involved

    • Volunteer to read/act out a part
    • Join in discussions and Socratic seminars
    • Keep an annotated text (include paraphrases, observations, and questions)
     

    Reading a Classic

    STEPS TO READ A CLASSIC

    1.  READ ALOUD (or use internet audio); CONSULT MODERN TRANSLATION (see link below)

    2.  MARK DIALOGUE PASSAGES

    • WRITE LITERAL-LEVEL SUMMARIES on SIDE of DIALOGUE

    3.  ILLUSTRATE PASSAGES 

    4.  REREAD SECTIONS as need arises

    5.  ANALYZE for USE of SPECIFIC LITERARY ELEMENTS

    6.  DISCUSS in SMALL GROUP or SOCRATIC CIRCLE

    7. SUMMARIZE ON CORNELL NOTES/POSE QUESTIONS

      No Fear Shakespeare

      Using a Companion Text

      No Fear Shakespeare allows you to see Shakespeare's original text on one side and "real speak" version on the other.  It can be a great resource as you get used to the language.  Don't worry about "sticky passages" - this resource can offer valuable insight back to 1600!

       

      Athens...where we lay our scene

      The Martins at the Parthenon

       

      Visualizing the Play

      The lovely Hippolyta, Amazon Queen

      Description

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