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Senior English   Tags: english, jozefowski, senior english  

Coursework and guides for Senior English reading and writing
Last Updated: Apr 15, 2014 URL: http://libguides.mpsaz.net/seniorenglish Print Guide RSS Updates

Reading and Writing Resources Print Page
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How to Access Databases and email (Class Example)

Grammar Help

 

Weekly Advice: Grammar Girl

 

Writing Rubrics

 

Words of Writing Wisdom

"If a writer of prose knows enough about what he is writing about he may omit things that he knows and the reader, if the writing is truly enough, will have a feeling of those things as strongly as though the writer had stated them. The dignity of movement of the iceberg is due to only one-eighth of it being above water. The writer who omits things because he does not know them only makes hollow places in his writing." Ernest Hemingway

     

    Databases

     Databases 

    Databases contain articles and information collected from books, encyclopedias, magazines, websites, newcasts and other information formats. Databases offer current, accurate, unbiased, reviewed information. Most databases give citation information in MLA format and others. There are two important database types -- article and subject.

    Article Databases

    Article databases (also called periodical databases) include the citations, abstracts or brief summaries, and full text articles from magazines, journals and newspapers. An example of an article database that is available through the Library Resource website is EBSCO.

    Subject Oriented Databases

    Rather than build one massive, centralized database, most companies are building numerous subject-oriented databases. Examples of subject databases available through the Library Resource website are Facts on File, American History Online, or Science Online.

    *Note:  All Mesa Public Schools databases are available through the Library Resources web site.

    Database Links

     Databases available through MPS:

    • Encyclopedia Britannica
      Online encyclopedia with hundreds of thousands of articles, biographies, videos, images, and web sites.
    • Facts on File
      Online reference materials for schools and libraries. Specializes in core subject areas, such as history, science, literature, geography, health, and more.
    • EBSCO
      Integrated service that provides reference databases, subscription management, online journals, and more.
    • GALE
      Articles from all over the world from newspapers and Magazines.
     

    Tips For Evaluating Resources

    Accurate, current, and appropriate information are valuable commodities.  Be a discriminate consumer of information!  If you are not confident that the information you have retrieved is the best information for your purpose, ask a librarian for assistance.

    When evaluating information ask yourself . . .

    Authority:

    Who is the author? 

    What type of information is given about the author?  Position, Organizational affliliation, contact information?

    Is he/she an expert?

    Who is the publisher?  Are they reputable?

    Accuracy:

    Does the information presented seem accurate?  Are the facts verifiable?

    Does the author cite the sources of information used in the document? Are those sources verifiable?

    Objectivity:

    Is this fact or opinion?

    Is the information biased in any way?

    What kind of sites does this one link to? 

    Who is the intended audience? Determine the aim of the author or organization publishing the site.

    Is it an advertisement for a product or service?   

    Is it for political purposes?  Is it trying to sway public opinion on a social issue?

    Currency:

    Is the information up to date?

    Is the information current enough for your research?

    Has the information been updated?  Are the resources used and information provided by the author current?

    Relevancy:

    Is the information relevant to your research?

    Would you quote information from this source?                                                                               

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